Interview with Director Matt Falduto

Doreen Loring rehearses for Gidion’s Knot

Matt Falduto is the director of Dreawmwell’s upcoming production of Gidion’s Knot by Johnna Adams.  Performances will be held March 4, 5, 11 & 12, 7:30pm, at Public Space One (120 N. Dubuque St., Iowa City). Order your tickets today at http://www.dreamwell.com/view-tickets/

Why did you decide to direct Gidion’s Knot?
I loved the play from the first moments of reading it. It’s powerful and beautiful and tackles so many issues – the nature of art, our responsibility to our children, the role of a teacher and a lot more. I love the way that it’s written, with intentional pauses and stops and starts. It’s incredibly real and true. I knew directing this show would be an amazing journey and I was absolutely right.
What three words would you use to describe the show?
Heartbreaking. Soulful. Beautiful.

The play is written as one long scene. In what ways is this challenging for you as a director? Are there ways in which it makes the directing process easier?
It’s very challenging as a director because you need to keep the action moving. Two people talking can become boring on stage, but this play is written so well that the direction is there – you just need to uncover it. One of the best parts of this experience for me has been working with an old friend – Madonna Smith, who is my assistant director. Really, she could be called my co-director. It’s been so great to have someone to bounce ideas off of and to uncover direction that I missed. This play would not be what it is without her.

The play centers around the suicide of a young boy, and has a dark tone overall. How has this affected your rehearsal process?
It’s made it tough. I mean, to climb into these characters, the actors have to put themselves into their hearts and that can be painful. To their credit, they’ve done it unflinchingly and I’ve been very impressed with their commitment. Michele and Doreen have given their all for this show.

Why should people come see Gidion’s Knot?
Good theatre makes you ask questions. This is good theatre.